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I enjoy this site, and love to delve into many of the insightful post in it, but one thing I have always found odd is why not a National Journeymans License? I see post all the time asking about different states and licensing regulations. I see some states you don't even have to go to school studying Electrical Theory, and the Code, but only have to have X amount of hours on the Job training. Like here in Arkansas I'm attending 4 years of Community college, and have to have 8000 hours of on the job training. Then if I'm not mistaken I'll then have to score at least an 80% on my Journeymans test to reciprocate to the states listed in this link. http://www.labor.ar.gov/divisions/Pages/electricaInspectionLicensing.aspx

So why if I spend 4 years in school, 8000 hours of on the job training, and dedicating myself to understanding the minimum standards of Electrical installation that the NEC lays out. Why can't I work anytime, and anywhere in these United States w/o having to take additional test. I realize the AHJ has final authority, but they can't be less stringent than the NEC sets forth. Insurance companys are not local, but national, and if you provide an installation that is not up to code, they can still come after you in case of an incident. Anyways, sorry for drown out post, but just doesn't make since to me.
 

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I enjoy this site, and love to delve into many of the insightful post in it, but one thing I have always found odd is why not a National Journeymans License? I see post all the time asking about different states and licensing regulations. I see some states you don't even have to go to school studying Electrical Theory, and the Code, but only have to have X amount of hours on the Job training. Like here in Arkansas I'm attending 4 years of Community college, and have to have 8000 hours of on the job training. Then if I'm not mistaken I'll then have to score at least an 80% on my Journeymans test to reciprocate to the states listed in this link. http://www.labor.ar.gov/divisions/Pages/electricaInspectionLicensing.aspx

So why if I spend 4 years in school, 8000 hours of on the job training, and dedicating myself to understanding the minimum standards of Electrical installation that the NEC lays out. Why can't I work anytime, and anywhere in these United States w/o having to take additional test. I realize the AHJ has final authority, but they can't be less stringent than the NEC sets forth. Insurance companys are not local, but national, and if you provide an installation that is not up to code, they can still come after you in case of an incident. Anyways, sorry for drown out post, but just doesn't make since to me.
$$$$......:whistling2:
 

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Member IBEW LU #164
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States' Rights.

( seriously - that is the reason why lots of things are they way they are. )

However, I am a Journeyman anywhere the IBEW covers...so that is as close as you can get.
 

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$$$$......:whistling2:
That's pretty much what I was thinking, but it's not right.


States' Rights.

( seriously - that is the reason why lots of things are they way they are. )

However, I am a Journeyman anywhere the IBEW covers...so that is as close as you can get.

No offense at all, but I don't really believe in unions. I do see how they are needed in certain cases like I'm talking about. The ? is why should they be needed to me. Turns political after this so I will refrain.
 

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Salty Member
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I enjoy this site, and love to delve into many of the insightful post in it, but one thing I have always found odd is why not a National Journeymans License?
Because we are the United States. Each state has rights to make their own rules and as you so correctly pointed out the rules each state has set up for electrical work are vastly different.

How would you go about making a National license?

Would you force the states that do not require licenses or less stringent testing to toughen things up or would you tell states that have tough licensing rules to loosen up?

I hold a J-man license in MA, RI and CT, I am required by all three to take continuing education to renew my license.

Now MA and RI will let me take one 15 hour class for both every three years. On the other hand CT requires I take a four hour class every year.

This means every third year I am likely to be sitting in the exact same class two weekends is a row. Yes a pain in the ass but it is what it is.
 

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Member IBEW LU #164
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What do you mean by that?

You are not a jouneyman in MA RI or CT without a state license.
No but all I have to do is test there.

My meaning is the only nationally recognized 'standard' is the IBEW and/or the ABC. The ABC does not have a mechanism for traveling betwixt areas, so that leaves the IBEW.

Anywhere I go, I can work as an IBEW journeyman, and in almost every area I need no other qualification. In a couple of states...MA, RI, CT and CA I need to pass a state test to so certain kinds of work, but all recognize the IBEW qualifications for schooling and hours.
 

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Salty Member
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I have a Nationally Recognized license and I drive on any sidewalk in any state I happen to be in :jester:
The rules for driving in each state are much more similar than electrical codes and all states can see the advantage of having a national drivers license.
 

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Salty Member
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No but all I have to do is test there.
And pass. :thumbsup:

Until you do you are not an electrician here.

In a couple of states...MA, RI, CT and CA I need to pass a state test to do certain kinds of work,
As in electrical work for pay. :laughing:

MGL 141 Section 1A. No person, firm or corporation shall enter into, engage in, or work at the business or occupation of installing wires, conduits, apparatus, devices, fixtures, or other appliances for carrying or using electricity for light, heat, power, fire warning or security system purposes, unless such person, firm or corporation shall be licensed by the state examiners of electricians in accordance with this chapter and, with respect to security systems, unless such person, firm or corporation shall also be licensed by the commissioner of public safety in accordance with the provisions of sections fifty-seven to sixty-one, inclusive, of chapter one hundred and forty-seven.

This chapter shall not apply to: a person not engaged in the business described in this section who employs or contracts for the services of a person, firm or corporation engaged in such business; or to an apprentice employed by a person, firm or corporation licensed in accordance with this chapter; or to an agent, employee or assistant of a person, firm or corporation licensed in accordance with this chapter who does not engage in or perform the actual work described in this section.


but all recognize the IBEW qualifications for schooling and hours.
May recognize .... not required to recognize. Just like a non-union out of state worker can ask to have their work experience recognized.
 

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Anywhere I go, I can work as an IBEW journeyman, and in almost every area I need no other qualification. In a couple of states...MA, RI, CT and CA I need to pass a state test to so certain kinds of work, but all recognize the IBEW qualifications for schooling and hours.
I don't understand your point. These states recognize non-union work experience and school hours also. What does being union have anything to do with it?

I had my MA journeyman's license. I submitted the application paperwork to both CT and RI and took and passed their respective licensing exams. Never did the subject of whether I was union or non come into question. The same can be said for anyone (union or non) from anywhere in the country.

I work with 2 guys who came to MA, 1 from Florida and 1 from Arizona. All they needed to take the MA licensing exam was show proof of work and school hours or proof that they had a license in good standing from their home state, same as what you would have to do to qualify to sit for the exam. Simply stating "I'm in the IBEW" would not be sufficent. You would still need to show proof of at least 8000 hours of OJT and 600 hours of schooling that meet the standards set forth by the state of MA. Your IBEW schooling would most likely qualify, but you would still need to show the proof same as anyone else. Being in the IBEW would not give you a free pass.
 

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Mad Skills
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You would still need to show proof of at least 8000 hours of OJT and 600 hours of schooling that meet the standards set forth by the state of MA. Your IBEW schooling would most likely qualify, but you would still need to show the proof same as anyone else. Being in the IBEW would not give you a free pass.
If I print out my own diploma and hand write my OJT hours/job sites I've been on... is that good enough?

Does the training have to be from some sort of accredited institution or something?
 
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