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A friend of mine asked if I new the code on using wire nuts inside a panel. I do mostly commercial/industrial, and although we do make up panels, most of it is piped. So no need to do that, we just pull a new one in from the first j-box.
Any thoughts?
It's for his house that he is trying to sell.
 

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Tool 5150 nailed it. But I gotta ask, why does the fact that you're a "comm/industrial" guy make it okay to not know very basic code? I've been industrial my whole career but I know just as much "resi" code as the next guy because it's my fricking job to.

This isn't a dig on you personally but this same question comes up about every three weeks and it's always got the same precursor- "I normally do commercial"
 

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Tool 5150 nailed it. But I gotta ask, why does the fact that you're a "comm/industrial" guy make it okay to not know very basic code? I've been industrial my whole career but I know just as much "resi" code as the next guy because it's my fricking job to.

This isn't a dig on you personally but this same question comes up about every three weeks and it's always got the same precursor- "I normally do commercial"
I'm a commercial/industrial guy. There are many codes that are specific to residential that I don't know. Most of what I do know about residential codes I've learned by reading threads on this forum. Why would I waste my time reading the code book to learn codes that I don't use? We don't wire gas stations, I don't know anything about classified locations either. If I were ever to need to wire a gas station I would read up on it to learn those codes, but why do it if I don't need to? Same for residential. If I were ever needing to wire a house (hopefully never), I'll study the code to find the info I need. This seems to be pretty common. Most guys only know the codes that apply to the kind of work they do. There is too much to know to waste time and effort trying to remember codes that you'll never use.
 

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I'm a commercial/industrial guy. There are many codes that are specific to residential that I don't know. Most of what I do know about residential codes I've learned by reading threads on this forum. Why would I waste my time reading the code book to learn codes that I don't use? We don't wire gas stations, I don't know anything about classified locations either. If I were ever to need to wire a gas station I would read up on it to learn those codes, but why do it if I don't need to? Same for residential. If I were ever needing to wire a house (hopefully never), I'll study the code to find the info I need. This seems to be pretty common. Most guys only know the codes that apply to the kind of work they do. There is too much to know to waste time and effort trying to remember codes that you'll never use.
For one thing, the OP's question is not biased towards resit or industrial. It's a basic code most early electricians should know.
 

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Though many Dr. Home Inspector's PhD will write it up on his naughty list.
This.

Most HI's, and some electricians/inspectors misinterpret 312.8.
 

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I would not go out of my way to condone wire nuts in a panel to an apprentice, but in the same breath , somewhere along the way I would also point out it is allowed and sometimes necessary. It is like emergency brake use. There for when you need it, but not part of a daily driving routine.
 

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I would not go out of my way to condone wire nuts in a panel to an apprentice, but in the same breath , somewhere along the way I would also point out it is allowed and sometimes necessary. It is like emergency brake use. There for when you need it, but not part of a daily driving routine.
I agree
 

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For one thing, the OP's question is not biased towards resit or industrial. It's a basic code most early electricians should know.
I agree. The OP's question is general electrical knowledge, not specific to residential.

However, my reply was a response to the post I quoted, not the OP.
 

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EBFD6 said:
I'm a commercial/industrial guy. There are many codes that are specific to residential that I don't know. Most of what I do know about residential codes I've learned by reading threads on this forum. <B>Why would I waste my time reading the code book to learn codes that I don't use? </B>We don't wire gas stations, I don't know anything about classified locations either. If I were ever to need to wire a gas station I would read up on it to learn those codes, but why do it if I don't need to? Same for residential. If I were ever needing to wire a house (hopefully never), I'll study the code to find the info I need. This seems to be pretty common. Most guys only know the codes that apply to the kind of work they do. There is too much to know to waste time and effort trying to remember codes that you'll never use.
Learn anything and everything about your trade to make you a more efficient worker? Ain't nobody got time for that!

I had a lengthy rant regarding this but I'm currently on the road and sprint doesn't cover this patch of highway none too well. But the punchline is, it's never a waste of time learning something new.
 

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Tool 5150 nailed it. But I gotta ask, why does the fact that you're a "comm/industrial" guy make it okay to not know very basic code? I've been industrial my whole career but I know just as much "resi" code as the next guy because it's my fricking job to.

This isn't a dig on you personally but this same question comes up about every three weeks and it's always got the same precursor- "I normally do commercial"
:thumbsup:

I was all commercial before I got my license, unfortunately there were alot of resi codes that I didn't know, only what I learned while preparing & taking my license. This left me unprepared, and unfortunately I learned several lessons from failing inspections. Its water under the bridge now, but I fully agree with you that learning the code book is important to being a good electrician. Learning only what pertains to you can turn you into a "one trick pony".
 
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