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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
we were running short on larger wirenuts the other day, and the answer to get thru the shift was 'skip the grounds' normally this isnt our practice, but it was 4-5 solid #14s, no real chance of coming unraveled if twisted properly. this started a debate tho as to if it was legal or not. a quick look at the codebook at lunch didnt answer the question. so just wondering, is there a code requiring the grounds to be wirenutted?
 

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I've often wondered the same thing.

I don't believe in grounding. Bunch of witchcraft.
 

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we were running short on larger wirenuts the other day, and the answer to get thru the shift was 'skip the grounds' normally this isnt our practice, but it was 4-5 solid #14s, no real chance of coming unraveled if twisted properly. this started a debate tho as to if it was legal or not. a quick look at the codebook at lunch didnt answer the question. so just wondering, is there a code requiring the grounds to be wirenutted?
I have to ask what COMPANY would not have a grey wirenut on their truck?
 

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If you were under the NEC it would be this code section

110.14(B) Splices. Conductors shall be spliced or joined with splicing devices identified for the use or by brazing, welding, or soldering with a fusible metal or alloy. Soldered splices shall first be spliced or joined so as to be mechanically and electrically secure without solder and then be soldered. All splices and joints and the free ends of conductors shall be covered with an insulation equivalent to that of the conductors or with an insulating device identified for the purpose.

Wire connectors or splicing means installed on conductors for direct burial shall be listed for such use.

I am sure the CEC has something like it.
 

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Here ya go

10-808 Installation of equipment bonding conductors
(1) The bonding conductor for equipment shall be permitted to be spliced or tapped, but such splices or taps shall be made only within boxes, except in the case of open wiring where they shall be permitted to be made externally from boxes and shall be covered with insulation.
(2) Where more than one bonding conductor enters a box, all such conductors shall be in good electrical contact with each other by securing all bonding conductors under bonding screws, or by connecting them together with a solderless connector and connecting one conductor only to the box by a bonding screw or a bonding device, and the arrangement shall be such that the disconnection or removal of electrical equipment fed from the box will not interfere with, or interrupt, the bonding continuity.
 

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I don't think it was ever legal under the NEC, but it was a common practice in this area when I started. I really don't see a wire nut as making a better connection than a inch or two if tightly twisted solid wire, but as far as I know the code has never accepted that.
 

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we were running short on larger wirenuts the other day, and the answer to get thru the shift was 'skip the grounds' normally this isnt our practice, but it was 4-5 solid #14s, no real chance of coming unraveled if twisted properly. this started a debate tho as to if it was legal or not. a quick look at the codebook at lunch didnt answer the question. so just wondering, is there a code requiring the grounds to be wirenutted?
12-112 (1).... would seem to me to require a marrette (or other approved device) IS required for all joints regardless of conductor being the hot, identified, or the bonding conductor...

12-112 Conductor joints and splices
(1) Conductors shall be spliced or joined with splicing devices approved for the purpose, or by brazing, welding, or soldering with a fusible metal or alloy.
(2) Soldered splices shall first be spliced or joined so as to be mechanically and electrically secure without solder and then be soldered.
(3) Joints or splices shall be covered with an insulation equivalent to that on the conductors being joined.
 

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i dont use twist on for ground wire
they are twisted tightly and a crimp-on connector on the end
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
12-112 (3) makes it sounds like the equal insulating measure of a bare ground is nothing

ah well, already picked up another bucket and will keep using them

thanks for the help tho, nice to get some opinions from other guys
 

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johnny_a said:
12-112 (3) makes it sounds like the equal insulating measure of a bare ground is nothing ah well, already picked up another bucket and will keep using them thanks for the help tho, nice to get some opinions from other guys
Meaning you could use an bare crimp like a c-tap
 

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i dont use twist on for ground wire
they are twisted tightly and a crimp-on connector on the end
I also use crimps. I twist them all up as well , because it makes for a neater looking box, but the crimp (or w/n as the case may be), iirc, makes it 'mechanically connected' .....


a term some ahj pointed out in the '90 NEC code cycle, which i can't seem to find in the '11 this a.m.....:(

~CS~
 

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It burns my eyeballs every time wire nuts are referred to as marrettes or marrietes or whatever the hell you guys call them. I can just see a 6'6" (what would that be in meter's ) unshaven ,snow boots, scragally electrician standing in front of a supply house counter asking for some Marrettes in his funny sounding Frenchy French accent...
 
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It burns my eyeballs every time wire nuts are referred to as marrettes or marrietes or whatever the hell you guys call them. I can just see a 6'6" (what would that be in meter's ) unshaven ,snow boots, scragally electrician standing in front of a supply house counter asking for some Marrettes in his funny sounding Frenchy French accent...
Don't need to ask, the marrettes are near the front door!

Weren't you born Canadian? Stop trying to act all 'Murican 'n shizz. :laughing:

There's plenty of brands that have taken over common vernacular.
 
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