Electrician Talk banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I need to wire 110 volt in USA this fan but I'm not sure where connect the black (hot) and the white wire (the ground) There int green wire ground in New York City
I guess from the picture the LINE1 I should connect my black and LINE2 my white. and tape together the ORANGE,BROWN,RED
Thank you for help
CArlo
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I mean my black wire connect to the LINE1(PURPLE), my white (the ground) connect to LINE2 (BLACK,WHITE,YELLOW) and ORANGE,BROWN,RED taped together (none of my wire connect to them
 

·
Registered
Residential remodeling
Joined
·
185 Posts
Sorry, I misunderstood your thinking. Just remember the orange, brown, and red actually are made up together stripped and wire nutted.
Also, correct terminology for the white line power is neutral. A ground is considered different (green) even though it goes to the same bar in the main panel.
 

·
Electrical Contractor
Trying to retire or at least slow down a bit, but life not cooperating
Joined
·
4,765 Posts
What colors did your Journeyman tell you connect to?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Metersocket648

·
Premium Member
residential, commercial, and industrial
Joined
·
234 Posts
@Kevin , where are you?? We need your expertise
 

·
Premium Member
residential, commercial, and industrial
Joined
·
234 Posts

·
Premium Member
residential, commercial, and industrial
Joined
·
234 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: Milio9548

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Sorry, I misunderstood your thinking. Just remember the orange, brown, and red actually are made up together stripped and wire nutted.
Also, correct terminology for the white line power is neutral. A ground is considered different (green) even though it goes to the same bar in the main panel.
Actually the white wire is the "grounded" conductor, and the green is the "grounding" conductor.
The NEC avoided using the word "neutral" until it was finally defined in the 2008 code.
 

·
Premium Member
residential, commercial, and industrial
Joined
·
234 Posts
Actually the white wire is the "grounded" conductor, and the green is the "grounding" conductor.
The NEC avoided using the word "neutral" until it was finally defined in the 2008 code.
Then there are some people that simply call them positive and negative, rarely have i heard people call the grounded conductor "common"
 

·
Premium Member
residential, commercial, and industrial
Joined
·
234 Posts
I jerked off too much, now I can't see wire colors.🤣🤣🤣 Guess I'll need retraining.
🤣🤣🤣now you can pull wire like a mofo with that arm but can't color code worth **** 🤣🤣
 

·
Coffee drinking member
I pretwist and then use wire nuts. Solder pots rule.
Joined
·
13,680 Posts
I would buy a cup of coffee and pretend the job was done.
 

·
Registered
Residential remodeling
Joined
·
185 Posts
Then there are some people that simply call them positive and negative, rarely have i heard people call the grounded conductor "common"
Common is a term used on HID ballasts and door bells referring to a terminal that is the same on either/same configurations.
 

·
Super Moderator
Retired
Joined
·
16,961 Posts
Thanks for posting on ElectricianTalk.com. However, working with electricity and electrical systems can be unsafe if not done by a professional licensed electrician. The moderators of this site would like to advise you to contact a professional electrician in your area.

If you are permitted by law in your area to do your own electrical work, please sign up at our sister site, www.DIYChatroom.com where many of our professionals are also members and are looking forward to assist you with your needs.

Please take a moment to post your question at www.DIYChatroom.com If you're not already a member of DIYChatroom.com you can sign up for a free account by going to Register

We apologize for any inconvenience that this may have caused. This thread has been closed.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top