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Working with parallel conductors.

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I'm going to be bidding larger resi jobs requiring taps for parallel conductors. Do you like working with more, smaller parallel conductors, or fewer, larger conductors? Do you install a distribution block, or use Polaris taps at the gutter? I have a quote in with my supplier to get a pulse on the price for jobs like this. I'd really like to make a move toward larger service installs and away from the drywall dust and vermiculite.

I think I would prefer multiple smaller conductors instead of fighting larger ones, but having more conductors to pull through could be a pain. Thoughts? Advice? Go home resi guy, you're drunk?
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I always try to stay at 350 or below (prefer 250 or lower). I hate 500. (this is copper)

Whenever I have used parallel conductors I try to get the lugs at each end of the run so they all terminate on the equipment w/no connections in between.
 

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When you say no connections in between - you mean taps?
I guess it depends on what we are doing. I'm thinking going from a CT cabinet to the main disconnect/s, or between panel and sub panel (on larger projects).

When you say taps, how is this being wired, a larger conductor to a wireway then smaller conductors tapping off or ...?
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
When you say taps, how is this being wired, a larger conductor to a wireway then smaller conductors tapping off or ...?
That's correct. I would bring my paralleled conductors to a wireway and tap smaller conductors for the disconnects. I'd rather go with tried and true than reinvent the wheel, but whichever holds up the longest is what I want to install.

SH can install lugs on the conductors for you.
I'm going to ask them about this. Thank you.
 

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That's correct. I would bring my paralleled conductors to a wireway and tap smaller conductors for the disconnects. I'd rather go with tried and true than reinvent the wheel, but whichever holds up the longest is what I want to install.
Reinvent the wheel? Okay.
 
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I just mean installing the service how most contractors would. I don't want to stand out as being too different.
What kind of service are we talking about?
How large?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
250 al for us. Why parallels for this service? 2 sets of 250 al, one for each 200 amp panel.
I didn't really elaborate. My fault.

I have a potential customer and am just running through different ideas. Their plan is to construct a dwelling and pole barn 375' off the road, with the service meter and disconnects located at the pole barn. The barn is closest to the existing driveway, with the dwelling 250' away, parallel to the road. Somewhere between the road and the pole barn will be a transformer pad, which will be determined by the poco and the customer. Both structures will be fed by 200A.

I have no idea where the poco will want their meter. If it's at the road with the transformer, then there's some calculating I need to do. Lead times for 320A meters and 200A N3R panels are into next April, so there's time to go before any work begins.

In a perfect world the transformer will be set 350' off the road so that I can run a single conduit 250' to the dwelling.
 

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1 conduit, 1 wire pull, done
400-amp three-phase panel with a calculated load of 380-amps (things are tight these days).

U/G PVC from source to panel.

You would install a 3.5" conduit and 500kcmil.

I would install a 3" conduit (maybe could get by with a 2.5") and parallel #3/0 in one conduit. I would be able to handle 20 more amps than if I ran 500.
 
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Oh yea, one more good reason for paralleling is you get more amps per pound of copper in the smaller conductors than you do in the larger conductors. Hence, it's probably less expensive to parallel.
 

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400-amp three-phase panel with a calculated load of 380-amps (things are tight these days).

U/G PVC from source to panel.

You would install a 3.5" conduit and 500kcmil.

I would install a 3" conduit (maybe could get by with a 2.5") and parallel #3/0 in one conduit. I would be able to handle 20 more amps than if I ran 500.
Make it a 200’ run and show me how much more you spent
 
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