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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you find the first receptacle in the chain feeding a office area. Remove it and then add a outlet and inlet would that be against code.

I have a office area for me and the wife and its covered in cables due to the ups unit if i could move the ups to the first receptacle then feed the rest of the receptacles off the ups that would tidy up the mess and it doesn't seem against code as all the receptacles are 15 amp.
 

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Big nosed attic troll
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If you find the first receptacle in the chain feeding a office area. Remove it and then add a outlet and inlet would that be against code.

I have a office area for me and the wife and its covered in cables due to the ups unit if i could move the ups to the first receptacle then feed the rest of the receptacles off the ups that would tidy up the mess and it doesn't seem against code as all the receptacles are 15 amp.
u broke't muh brains
 

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I am running late, but the cord connections are not a chapter three method for permanent wiring if I am understanding what it is you are trying to slap together.
 

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Hackenschmidt
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If you find the first receptacle in the chain feeding a office area. Remove it and then add a outlet and inlet would that be against code.

I have a office area for me and the wife and its covered in cables due to the ups unit if i could move the ups to the first receptacle then feed the rest of the receptacles off the ups that would tidy up the mess and it doesn't seem against code as all the receptacles are 15 amp.
Look at Arlington's TV bridge kits, they do pretty much what you're saying. You install an inlet in the wall under the TV, supplying a recssed receptacle behind the TV. You run a short heavy duty extension cord from your surge strip to the inlet. This lets you get high quality surge protection behind a TV where there's no room for a surge strip.

I can't think of anything in the code that would prevent you from supplying a string of receptacles the same way.
 

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I like ceiling fans & EMT
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One trick we used to use in theatre and other similar situations where we had to rig a lot of stuff:

Theoretically at least, anything with a plug on the end isnt subject to inspections. You just unplug it before the inspector or fire marshal comes, "Oh that stuff isnt connected any more." We'd get a lot of eye rolls, obviously they knew what we were doing, but no one ever wrote us up. I have no idea if that would apply in residential.
 

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Look at Arlington's TV bridge kits, they do pretty much what you're saying. You install an inlet in the wall under the TV, supplying a recssed receptacle behind the TV. You run a short heavy duty extension cord from your surge strip to the inlet. This lets you get high quality surge protection behind a TV where there's no room for a surge strip.

I can't think of anything in the code that would prevent you from supplying a string of receptacles the same way.
Look at Arlington's TV bridge kits, they do pretty much what you're saying. You install an inlet in the wall under the TV, supplying a recssed receptacle behind the TV. You run a short heavy duty extension cord from your surge strip to the inlet. This lets you get high quality surge protection behind a TV where there's no room for a surge strip.

I can't think of anything in the code that would prevent you from supplying a string of receptacles the same way.
Let me throw in a boomerang. Where does the code require overcurrent protection? At the point where the conductor
receives it's supply. (which your downstream wiring doesn't). 240.21
 

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I make all the electrons line up for their Flu shots
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My slow internet this morning made me do an oopsie...........
 

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Cords are exempt. Fixed wiring is not.
 

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So right now, over at Arlington...... the members of the board of directors are singing.

We did a bad bad thing, We did a bad bad thing....
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Let me throw in a boomerang. Where does the code require overcurrent protection? At the point where the conductor
receives it's supply. (which your downstream wiring doesn't). 240.21

That's what i was wondering. With the ups plugged in then the ups breaker takes care of the situation but as its a standard receptacle there is a possibility you could back feed it with anything you like.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
 

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Big nosed attic troll
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this reminds me...i was just asked to cord/plug a furnace. totally unrelated but reminded me nonetheless lol
 

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We did a bad bad thing.......
 

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That's called a "clock box" been doing em in public schools for decades
Clock box's have a built in receptacle outlet. That has a built in male thingy. It's not like I wouldn't do something like this at my own place, but pop did ask us if there was anything wrong and so there you go.........
 
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